Sparkling wine

With its bubbles, sparkling wine is the protagonist of parties and convivial moments; sparkling wines are characterised by the content of carbon dioxide, derived from fermentation, and by an internal pressure of at least 3 atmospheres (a lower pressure is used for bubbly wines, while a pressure of at least 3.5 atmospheres is used for Quality Sparkling Wines); Generally speaking, a sparkling wine has an average pressure of 6 atmospheres, with the exception of “Franciacorta Satèn” which has less than 5.

In this wine shop you will be able to choose from a selection of more than 700 expressions of sparkling wine, from the mother of all bubbles, “Champagne”, both from famous maisons and small sparkling wine producers, to its compatriot “Crémant”. In this selection you will also be able to enjoy many high quality Italian sparkling wines, from “Franciacorta” to “Trentodoc”, which nowadays reach levels of quality that are in no way inferior to “Champagne”, as well as “Alta Langa” (produced only in “millesimato” versions), or the most widely drunk bubbly in the world, “Prosecco”, Brut and Extra Dry, from its Rive (the "cru" of Prosecco) to the new “Prosecco Rosé”, to go on with the “Oltrepò Pavese”, which was the first in Italy to know “Pinot Nero”, to “Lessini Durello”, and ending with all the other expressions of Metodo Classico and Charmat from all the Italian regions and even more with indigenous grapes.

The sparkling wine is obtained thanks to a second fermentation, which can be performed in the bottle, in the case of the Classical Method or Champenoise, in autoclave tanks, called Charmat Method or Martinotti Method (the one of Prosecco); the first ones are more characterized by elegance and creaminess, while the second ones by a greater freshness.

The sparkling wine is obtained thanks to a second fermentation, which can be performed in the bottle, in the case of the Classical Method or Champenoise, in autoclave tanks, called Charmat Method or Martinotti Method (the one of Prosecco); the first ones are more characterized by elegance and creaminess, while the second ones by a greater freshness. According to the legend, the Classical Method of sparkling wine production was introduced in 1600 by Dom Pérignon, the inventor of Champagne. The sparkling wine is obtained from a basic wine, which can be from different years ("cuvée") or from the same year (“Millesimato”, if at least 85% is from the same harvest); to this is then added the liqueur de tirage, made up of wine, yeast and mineral substances, and the wine is capped. At this point, a second fermentation takes place in the bottle, which produces alcohol, carbon dioxide and other substances that will later define the aromatic qualities of the sparkling wine; this phase is called "presa di spuma" and lasts 6 months.

At the end of this period, the yeasts are completely dissolved (autolysis process) and settle to the bottom; at this point the sparkling wine is left for further months in contact with the lees (generally from 15 months to several years), placed on wooden racks ("pupitre"), where they are periodically tilted until the lees accumulate in the neck of the bottle, and are subject to disgorgement, which involves removing the cork and lees, before finally adding a dosing syrup (except for Dosage Zero), liqueur d'expedition, and corking the bottle again.

Sparkling wine made using the Charmat or Martinotti method, on the other hand, requires the addition of yeasts and sugars to the standard wine cuvée, followed by re-fermentation in autoclaves at constant pressure, in order to avoid the dispersion of carbon dioxide; the “presa di spuma” process lasts at least 30 days, and can last in some cases (“Charmat Lungo”) several months (even 12 or more).

Many of the best Italian sparkling wines are made from the cuvée champenoise of Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, but there are also more and more high-quality Italian sparkling wines made from indigenous grapes, from “Verdicchio” in the Marche region to “Grillo” in Sicily, but also “Nebbiolo” (as evidenced by Giancarlo Travaglini's 'Nebolé'), “Trebbiano di Lugana” or “Bombino Bianco” from Apulia, wonderfully interpreted by D'Araprì.

Based on the sugar content, a sparkling wine is accompanied by one of the following descriptions:

  • Dosage Zero (or Pas Dosé, Zero Dosage, Brut Nature), if it has less than 3 grams of sugar per litre;
  • Extra Brut, if it has at least 3 grams but less than 6;
  • Brut, if it has between 6 and 12 grams;
  • Extra Dry, if the residual sugar content is between 12 and 17 grams per litre;
  • Dry, if between 17 and 32;
  • Demi Sec, from 32 to 50;
  • Dolce (or Doux), if it has more than 50 grams of sugar per litre.

Sparkling wine, which is generally served cold at between 8 and 10 degrees Celsius, is a wine that can be paired with anything from appetisers to desserts. A Charmat sparkling wine is distinguished by its smaller structure and greater freshness; in the case of a “Prosecco”, for example, it can be a perfect accompaniment to aperitifs, appetisers and delicate fish-based first courses, while if it is sweeter, such as a “Moscato d'Asti”, it can be combined with leavened desserts and creams. The Metodo Classico, on the other hand, with its greater structure and elegance, is an ideal accompaniment for the whole meal, starting with aperitifs, especially those with less time on the lees, and ending with grilled white meats, in the case of more intense and structured sparkling wines.

From sparkling “Champagne” to “Trentodoc” and “Prosecco”, from “Crémant” to “Alta Langa”, “Franciacorta”, from “Lessini Durello” to “Oltrepò Pavese”, scroll down and discover the exclusive collection of Italian sparkling wines (and not only) at discounted prices of the wineshop Wine Online.

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