Amarone della Valpolicella

Amarone della Valpolicella is one of the greatest Italian red wines, with an extraordinary persistence, as well as the most prestigious wine of Valpolicella. Valpolicella is a wine region north of Verona, whose centuries-old wine tradition has been going on since Roman times; in fact, they are the ones who coined the term, from Vallis-polis-cellae, i.e., Valley with many cellars.

As many other great wines, the history of Amarone is shrouded in legend. According to the myth, it was 1936 when Adelino Lucchese, manager of a wine cooperative of the area, tasted a dry wine from a barrel of Recioto forgotten in the cellar for many years, and exclaimed: “but this is not a bitter, it is an Amarone!”.

Amarone della Valpolicella is the result of the fermentation of the best died grapes from the Corvina, Corvinone and Rondinella native vines, and it is possible to opt for other authorized grape varieties only for a small portion. The grapes are dried for about three months in special drying lofts, in which ventilation allows their drying and protection from mildew. The wine is aged for minimum 2 years for Amarone Classico, starting from the month of January that follows grape harvest, and for minimum 4 years for Amarone Riserva.

Amarone’s production takes place in the Valpolicella territory, in the foothills that goes from Lake Garda to the north of the province of Verona: here the closeness to the mountains leads to the creation of a cold climate that allows an optimal development of acidity, fundamental to support those rich and sumptuous wines, and at the same time the closeness to the lake protects the bunches from frost. Equally important, as for any great wine, is also the soil where everything comes from; Amarone is born in grounds characterized by limestone, marl, basalts, poor soils that are typical of high-quality viticulture.

From historical producers of Amarone Classico such as Quintarelli, Bertani, Zenato, Speri e Tommasi, to move on to artisan companies like Le Guaite di Noemi, Piccoli and Vogadori, concluding with Nicolis, Villa Spinosa and Villa Canestrari, scroll down and discover all Amaroni della Valpolicella.

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